NEXT GEN FEEDSTOCK…FOR NEXT GEN FUEL

Continuing work in feedstock resources makes Biodico adaptive to a growing and changing alternative energy marketplace.

Icon of a sunflower representing Biodico's relentless search for solid crop selections for promising biofuel feedstock solutions.

CROP SELECTION

The most important criterion for crop selection for biodiesel production is oil yields.  Other important metrics include drought tolerance, pest resistance, cold weather tolerance, growth rate, harvesting patterns, and harvesting requirements.

Icon representing Biodico's commitment to laboratory work through every stage of Feedstock development for bioenergy usage.

LABORATORY

Laboratory work occurs through all stages of feedstock development.  Biodico has tested thousands of different crop, seed, and oil samples for outside clients and internal development in the laboratory with state of the art facilities.  

Icon of a leaf that represents Biodico's use of Greenhouses to grow and regulate feedstock development for alternative energy needs.

GREENHOUSES

Greenhouse work can be used in order to have a more controlled prototype test for crops prior to planting out plots; to prepare seedlings for transplant out to test plots; or, in some cases, to grow crops for commercial use, algae as an example.

Icon of a farm that represents test plots for the staging of Feedstock tests.

TEST PLOTS

Test plots are commonly used for the prototyping stage of a feedstock project.  During the test plot stage, commonly tested variables include row spacing, irrigation types, irrigation volumes, effect of temperature and climate, effect of soil type, and seasonal variation.

Biodico develops projects with strategic partners

PROMISING FEEDSTOCKS
An image of algae, a promising biofuel feedstock in development at Biodico.

ALGAE

Algae have the potential to be an enormously high-yield fuel for algaculture.  Through work funded by the California Energy Commission, Biodico was able to develop a symbiotic algaculture (the cultivation of algae) technology that yields 5,300 gallons of oil per acre. Learn more about algae production.

An Image of Company Founder Russ Teall in a mature Jatropha field used as a promising alternative fuel feedstock.

JATROPHA

Jatropha has many properties that make it a great biofuel feedstock crop.  It has high oil yields, the individual seeds have high oil content, and the plant is drought and pest resistant.  The plants live for up to 75 years and can be harvested several times a year.  The plant is ideally suited for the tropics, but Biodico is developing colder weather varietals. Learn more about the feasibility of Jatropha.

An image of brassica plants that are used as feedstock source for biofuel production.

BRASSICAS

Brassicas are a genus of plant that includes canola, camelina, and rapeseed.  Brassica varietals can be grown on saline soil and otherwise unusable farmland.  They can also be intercropped on land already in use for crops with large row spacing such as orchards. Learn more about Brassicas.

ALTERNATIVE BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCK

Feedstocks are the single largest cost of biodiesel production. The ability to economically produce multiple feedstocks grown in a sustainable manner without impacting food production is of fundamental importance. Biodico has worked from its inception on using alternative feedstocks.  Waste cooking oil is collected from restaurants and food processing plants under the Green Restaurant Service. Based upon multi-feedstock research conducted by Biodico for the U.S. Department of Energy, Biodico was hired by the U.S. Agency for International Development and the U.S. Trade Development Agency to conduct a multi-feedstock biodiesel feasibility study in India in 2005. In consultation with the Indian government, non-edible biodiesel feedstocks were made a priority, with the conclusion that Jatropha curcas represented the greatest potential.

After many years of genetic improvements, Biodico has worked to establish Jatropha nurseries and orchard development programs in many countries. Work with international academic and commercial institutions has led to the development of other feedstock models based upon suitability and sustainability under local conditions, including intercropping alternatives. No feedstock combination is perfect under all conditions, so a multi-faceted strategy has been employed.  Additional advanced feedstocks are being developed including some innovative approaches to the cultivation of algae and related species for very concentrated high yield oil production using waste products. This advanced algaculture process is being developed in conjunction with the U.S. Navy based on Biodico’s patented MPU technology.  Biodico is well poised to help organizations figure out local and regional potentials for feedstocks, business development, renewable energy production, energy markets, regulations, and incentives.  Please contact us for more information if you have a project that you think we may be able to help make a success.

YEAR THAT BIODICO STARTED DEVELOPING BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCKS

Waste Vegetable Oil Collection: 2000
Jatropha: 2005
Next-Gen Brassicas: 2007
Castor: 2008
Symbiotic Algaculture: 2011
A look at Biodico's proprietary AquaCulture lab for feedstock development in Ventura, California.

0GALLONS PER ACRE JATROPHA

0GALLONS PER ACRE ALGAE

0GALLONS PER ACRE CASTOR

0GALLONS PER ACRE BRASSICAS